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Courses
  • MAE 6840 Cancer for Physicists and Engineers.

    Introduction to cancer for physicists and engineers. Nature of cancer. Introductory human cell biology and modes of dysregulation by carcinogenesis. Cell cycle, aberrant mitogens, dysregulation of checkpoints. Genetic foundations of cancer phenotype--germline and somatic. Tumorigenesis and metastasis. Clinical staging and medical management of the most common cancers.

    • Scheduled Spring 2013
  • MAE 5240/6240 Physics of Micro- and Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics.

    Introduction to fluid mechanics in micro- and nanofabricated devices.

    Fluid mechanics: physicochemical description of hydrodynamics, mixing phenomena at low Re, capillarity, double layer phenomena and electrokinetic effects, optical and electrical particle manipulation, nanofluidic applications such as entropic and confinement effects, nonlinear E-field effects. Some topics include Maxwell and Navier-Stokes equations, Couette/Poiseuille flow, Stokes flow, fluid circuits, microfluidic mixing, potential flow, mass and charge transport, solution chemistry, electrodynamics, the electrical double layer, electroosmosis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, induced-charge electrokinetics, chemical separations, DNA transport, and zeta potential.

    Click the link for an online version of the microfluidics textbook used for this class.

    For those interested in students' evaluation of effort and time load for this course, please see question 14 on the course evaluations (available to Cornell community only):
  • MAE 7240 Advanced Micro- and Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics.

    Second term of micro- and nanoscale fluid mechanics, with stress on nonlinear electrokinetics, expansion and perturbation solutions, nonequilibrium solutions, and nanofluidics.

    For those interested in students' evaluation of effort and time load for this course, please see question 14 on the course evaluations (available to Cornell community only):

  • MAE 4230/5230 Intermediate Fluid Dynamics.

    Emphasis is placed on both the fundamental principles and numerical calculation of real flows using a computational fluid dynamics package. Topics covered include some exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layers, wakes and jets, separation, compressible flow, and turbulence.

    For those interested in students' evaluation of effort and time load for this course, please see question 14 on the course evaluations (available to Cornell community only):

  • MAE 427 Experimental Laboratory in Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer.

    Laboratory exercises in fluid mechanics and the thermal sciences.

    Measurements of flame temperature, pressure, heat transfer, viscosity, lift and drag, fluid-flow rate, effects of turbulence, air foil stall, flow visualization, and spark-ignition engine performance. Instrumentation, techniques and analysis, and interpretation of results. Biweekly written assignments with extensive feedback.

    • Fall 2004
Collaborative work led by Shashi Murthy's group at Northeastern. Imaging of colony growth with and without stem cell enrichment. (see ref here).
Atomic-force microscopy image of polyester/polyethylene fiber containing 1120 nanodomains and showing domain coalescence and domain dimensional instabilities, particularly in the outward radial direction (courtesy J. Hinestroza). We are using microfluidic techniques to pattern micron-scale portions of these nanofibers for material characterization.
A miniaturized laser-induced fluorescence detector. This, combined with high-pressure microfluidic control, enables high-pressure liquid chromatography separations of proteins and peptides.